75th Anniversary of the Dieppe Raid
19 August 1942 – 2017

The Atlantic coast takes on a saucer-shaped indentation in front of Dieppe, creating a ring of cliffs from which the Canadians came under fire. In this photo, returning Canadians examine German fortifications at Dieppe in 1944.
Credit: Lieut. Ken Bell / Canada. Dept. of National Defence / Library and Archives Canada / PA-134448.

 

“Disembarkation of wounded troops during Operation JUBILEE, the raid on Dieppe.”
Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-183773.

Today marks the 75th Anniversary of the Dieppe Raid. On 19 August 1942, 4,963 Canadians led the 6,100-strong raiding force as it landed on 8 separate points of the Atlantic coast. While local successes were achieved by British commandos attacking artillery batteries at neighbouring Varengeville and Berneval, the Canadians struggled to enter the town from the main landing beaches. Only half of the supporting armour from the Calgary Regiment (Tank) made it past the seawall, the rest bogging down or breaking tank treads on the shingle beach. A vicious infantry battle took place within the beachfront casino and surrounding streets, while the remaining tanks, blocked by anti-tank obstacles, provided fire support. By 09:30, just six hours after the first landings, a general withdrawal began. Tanks that had passed the seawall covered the retreat to the beaches. As the tanks pulled back, they too became stuck on the shingle beach. Fighting valiantly, their crews remained in their tanks, serving as immobile gun support. By 14:00, the withdrawal was complete.  

The Canadians suffered 916 fatalities across the three branches of service. Only 2,210 of the 4,963 Canadians, many of whom were wounded, returned to England. Total casualties numbered 3,367, including 1,946 as prisoners of war (POW).  

Two Canadians received the Victoria Cross for their actions that day, as well as a British Commando 

Reverend John W. Foote, VC.
Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence / Library and Archives Canada / PA-501320.

Reverend John W. Foote, VC, of Madoc, Ontario, became the first member of the Canadian Chaplain Services to earn the Victoria Cross. As Chaplain of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry, Foote walked up and down the beach, administering aid to the wounded and dying. During the withdrawal, Foote made countless trips bringing the wounded to the evacuation craft arriving at the beach. Finally, at the end, Foote stepped off the last craft out, and rejoined those left stranded on the beach, in order to provide comfort and ministry to the thousands of Canadian POWs. 

Lt.-Col. Charles Cecil Ingersoll Merritt, VC.
Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence, 2017.

Lieutenant-Colonel Cecil Merritt, VC, of Vancouver, British Columbia, led the South Saskatchewan Regiment ashore at Pourville. As the regiment suffered mounting casualties attempting to cross a bridge, Merritt stepped forward and calmly walked numerous parties across through murderous fire. When the order for withdrawal was given, Merritt, though twice wounded, mounted a rear-guard action that enabled many others to escape off the beach. He too became a prisoner of war.

 

The official medal citation for Honourary Captain John Weir Foote, VC.
Credit: The London Gazette, Publication date: 12 February 1946, Supplement: 37466 Page: 941.
The official medal citation for Lieutenant-Colonel Cecil Merritt, VC.
Credit: The London Gazette, Publication date: 2 October 1942, Supplement: 35729, Page: 4323.
The official medal citation for Lieutenant-Colonel Cecil Merritt, VC.
Credit: The London Gazette, Publication date: 2 October 1942, Supplement: 35729, Page: 4324.