More than 100,000 students from across Canada recite In Flanders Fields

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of In Flanders Fields, more than 100,000 students from over 1000 schools in every province and territory recited this iconic poem during Remembrance Week.  The Vimy Foundation launched this initiative earlier this month.

Thank you to all the teachers, students, principals, parents, and all other supporters who helped us to reach this ambitious goal!

This year marks the centennial of the writing of In Flanders Fields, the iconic Canadian poem from Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae. We no longer have any veterans of the First World War still with us: we have lost that direct connection with their stories – of the tragedy of war, of the reasons why they enlisted to fight, of the impact of the war on them, their families, and their country.

It is up to all of us to remember. Thank you to all who help to pass the torch of remembrance to Canada’s young people.

Some news articles about this initiative:

November-06-15, Calgary Herald   Canadian kids pledge to recite famous Remembrance Day poem

November-10-15, Times-Colonist  ‘In Flanders Fields’ still Canada’s pre-eminent war poem, even after 100 years

November-10-15, Maclean’s ‘In Flanders Fields’: 100,000 Canadian children recite 100-year-old poem

 

In no particular order, here are some of the classrooms across the country that participated:

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Poll Shows Most Canadians Can Identify “In Flanders Fields” (76%) as Country’s Most Famous Poem

Vimy Foundation campaign to encourage Canadian youth to recite famous poem reaches 100,000 students

Toronto, ON – November 9, 2015 – Most (76%) Canadians can correctly identify In Flanders Fields as the Canadian poem written during the First World War 100 years ago, and John McCrae (61%) as the author of that iconic poem. Most encouraging is the young Canadians (18-34) scored highest in knowledge and attitude related to the famous poem.

When presented with a list of six options, three quarters (76%) of Canadians could correctly identify In Flanders Fields as the Canadian poem written during the First World War 100 years ago. Interestingly, Canadians aged 18 to 34 were most likely (80%) to correctly identify In Flanders Fields as the poem.

Among a list of six authors, six in ten (61%) Canadians could identify John McCrae as having written In Flanders Fields, although four in ten (39%) did not. Once again, young adults paved the way with their superior knowledge, with 68% correctly answering the question, more than the 63% of those aged 55+ and 55% of those aged 35 to 54 who identified McCrae as the author.

Three quarters (74%) of Canadians ‘agree’ that ‘In Flanders Fields should be designated as Canada’s National Poem by an Act of Parliament’, while just one quarter (26%) ‘disagrees’ with this position. The idea has a majority of support in every region of the country, including Quebec (51%).

With support is so high, it’s not surprising that eight in ten (82%) agree that hearing In Flanders Fields recited on Remembrance Day enhances their appreciation for Canada’s veterans, and most (84%) agree that every Remembrance Day ceremony in Canada should include a reading of In Flanders Fields.

In Flanders Fields…

The data show that some Canadians know more about this iconic poem than others:

–  Regionally, those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba (97%), Alberta (93%) and Atlantic Canada (92%) were most likely to identify In Flanders Fields as the Canadian poem written during the First World War.

–  Ontarians (74%), Atlantic Canadians (73%) and Albertans (73%) were most likely to correctly identify John McCrae as the author of this iconic poem.

–  Three in ten (30%) Canadians ‘agree’ that they can recite the poem In Flanders Fields by memory – matching the 30% of the population that could correctly identify the first verse.

–  The poem has a preeminent position in Canadian culture, so much so that two in three (66%) Canadians ‘agree’ that they learned In Flanders Fields as a child, rising to 73% agreement among those aged 18 to 34.

 

Click here to read more detailed results from Ipsos.

For more information:

Jennifer Blake
Communications Coordinator, Vimy Foundation
416.595.1917 ext.2
jblake@vimyfoundation.ca

Recite In Flanders Fields with the Vimy Foundation

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This Remembrance Week (November 5-11, 2015), the Vimy Foundation is calling on all Canadian schools to help pass the torch of remembrance by reciting  In Flanders Fields in their classrooms. This year marks the centennial of In Flanders Fields, Canada’s most famous poem, written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae during the First World War in 1915.

Each classroom will be eligible to win an iPad and Vimy Prize Pack courtesy of the Vimy Foundation.

Founded in 2006, the mission of the Vimy Foundation is to preserve and promote Canada’s First World War legacy, as symbolized with the victory at the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1917, a milestone when Canada came of age and was then recognized on the world stage.

Contact us at info@vimyfoundation.ca with any questions.

Canadians Recite the Poem:

In 2014, Postmedia asked Canadians to recite In Flanders Fields: 

Victoria Jackman, 2014 Vimy Pilgrimage Award winner

Dr. David Suzuki:

Find more videos of prominent Canadians on their site dedicated to the First World War.

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VIMY FOUNDATION RELEASES NEW POLL FOR REMEMBRANCE DAY 2014

Three in Ten (27%) Canadians Will Attend a Remembrance Day Ceremony This Year, 23% Said they Went Last Year

Vimy Foundation poll shows 82% Support Making November 11 a National Holiday

Toronto, ON – November 9, 2014 – Three in ten (27%) Canadians say that they will attend an official Remembrance Day service on November 11th this year, an increase over the 23% who said they attended one last year, according to a new Ipsos Reid poll conducted on behalf of the Vimy Foundation.

There has been a great deal of attention placed on the sacrifice of Canadian soldiers recently, given the tragic killings of Corporal Nathan Cirillo and Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent on Canadian soil. Despite this, the 27% of Canadians who say they will attend a ceremony this year is down from the 30% who, in 2012, said they would attend.

There is presently a bill before Parliament that would make Remembrance Day a national statutory holiday. The poll shows that most (82%) Canadians would support November 11th being made holiday (down 3 points since a similar poll conducted in 2012), while just 18% would not (up 3 points).

While most Canadians won’t be attending an official service this year, eight in ten (77%) say that they will observe two minutes of silence at 11 o’clock on November 11th (down 3 points), and an equal proportion (77%, down 5 points) are wearing a poppy in the lead up to Remembrance Day.

Honouring Canada’s Fallen…

The data show that some Canadians are more likely than others to remember Canada’s fallen in various ways:

Those in Alberta (41%) and Atlantic Canada (39%) are most likely to say they will attend an official ceremony, followed by those living in British Columbia (31%), Ontario (31%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (20%) and Quebec (9%).
Atlantic Canadians (94%) and Ontarians (90%) are most likely to say they will observe two minutes of silence at 11 o’clock on November 11th, followed by those in British Columbia (76%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (74%), Alberta (71%) and Quebec (55%).
Atlantic Canadians (94%) and British Columbians (90%) are most likely to say they’re wearing a poppy in the lead up to November 11th, followed by those living in Ontario (87%), Alberta (83%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (79%) and Quebec (43%).
Atlantic Canadians (94%) and residents of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (94%) are most likely to support Remembrance Day being made a national holiday, followed by a majority of those in British Columbia (88%), Ontario (84%), Alberta (81%) and Quebec (71%).
For more information

Jeremy Diamond
Executive Director
416.722.9754 (cell)
jdiamond@vimyfoundation.ca

THE VIMY FOUNDATION FEATURED IN GLOBAL NEWS REMEMBRANCE DAY COVERAGE

Global News, November 9, 2014: “More Canadians plan to attend Remembrance Day ceremonies: poll

Almost three in 10 Canadians say they plan to attend a Remembrance Day ceremony this year, according to a new poll.

That number is higher than last year and has been steadily rising for more than a decade, says Jeremy Diamond, executive director of The Vimy Foundation. Five years ago, around 18 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would attend a service.

The poll, done by Ipsos Reid for The Vimy Foundation and released to Global News, found that 27 per cent of those asked planned to attend a service this year.

Click here to read the full story on Global News, including poll results about attitudes on a November 11 national holiday and wearing a poppy.