25 December 1917

Credit: Canada. Dept. of National Defence/Library and Archives Canada/PA-005059 (modified from the original). Colourized by Canadian Colour.

On this day 100 years ago many Canadian servicemen and nurses celebrated Christmas abroad, from the hospital wards to the trenches. This Christmas Day photo was taken in 1917 at the Duchess of Connaught Canadian Red Cross Hospital in Taplow, England.

Wishing you a happy and peaceful time with family and friends this Holiday Season!

Today’s photograph has been colourized as part of The Vimy Foundation’s First World War In Colour project. Learn more about this project and see more photos by visiting https://www.vimyfoundation.ca/projects/.

The Halifax Christmas Tree At The Boston Common

Did you know when the Spanish flu struck in 1918, Nova Scotia sent a team of doctors to Boston as a symbol of gratitude for the assistance received from Massachusetts after the Halifax Explosion? In December 1918, this gratitude was extended in the form of a Christmas tree, sent from Halifax and installed at the Boston Common. In 1971 the tradition was reinstated and has taken place every year since, with the lighting of the annual tree signaling the start of Boston’s Christmas festivities. In Halifax the gesture remains a sobering reminder of the loss suffered in December 1917 (See Mac Donald, Curse of The Narrows – The Halifax Explosion 1917, p. 273-274).

See more here: https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/halifax-s-annual-christmas-tree-gift-for-boston-lights-the-city-1.3702456