#100DaysofVimy – January 30, 2017

Each Monday, we will share a brief biography of a soldier of the First World War with a Vimy connection. Today we honour Brigadier-Magistrate Oliver Milton Martin.

Oliver Milton Martin was a Mohawk of the Six Nations Grand River Reserve. Taking a leave from his job as a school teacher, Martin enlisted in 1916 with his two brothers. Martin was first an officer in the 114th Battalion (Haldimand), also known as “Brock’s Rangers” due to its high concentration of First Nations volunteers. In 1917, he was trained as an observer in the Royal Flying Corps and the following year qualified as a pilot.

After the war, Martin returned to teaching, while remaining in the Militia and taking command of the Haldimand Rifles in 1930. During the early years of the Second World War, Colonel Martin oversaw the training of new recruits at Niagara-on-the-Lake. Martin retired from service in 1944 with the rank of Brigadier. After the Second World War he was appointed the Provincial Magistrate in Ontario for the counties of York, Halton and Peel. As a Brigadier, Martin held the highest rank ever attained by a First Nations man in the Canadian Forces. In his honour, the East York branch of the Royal Canadian Legion is named the Brigadier O. Martin Branch.

 

Then-Lieutenant Martin, (sitting on left) posing with fellow oficers of the 107th Battalion (Winnipeg), July 1916. Note the knee-high mud on their boots - Martin spent 7 months in France & Belgium. Photo sourced from: “Canada’s Great War Album” Project, Canada’s History.
Then-Lieutenant Martin, (sitting on left) posing with fellow oficers of the 107th Battalion (Winnipeg), July 1916. Note the knee-high mud on their boots – Martin spent 7 months in France & Belgium. Photo sourced from: “Canada’s Great War Album” Project, Canada’s History.